10 Tips to Writing Your Resume

Make your resume stand out and land your dream job!

1. Put your contact information in the header of your resume. It’s like the “free space” on a bingo board, since the header of your resume doesn’t compete with the actual page itself. In other words, it’ll give you more room throughout the page to list your work experience, accomplishments, education, etc.

Put your contact information in the header of your resume. It’s like the “free space” on a bingo board, since the header of your resume doesn’t compete with the actual page itself. In other words, it’ll give you more room throughout the page to list your work experience, accomplishments, education, etc.

2. Keep the format and font consistent. My go-to resume font is Times New Roman, since it’s professional and easy to read (major key). When it comes to formatting, make sure the spacing throughout the page is the same, as well as how you choose to list your information. Think to yourself:

  • Are all my bullets aligned (and am I using the same type of bullets)?
  • Am I listing my dates and experience the same way (ex. Employer name, dates, position, responsibilities, etc.)?
  • Am I using the same verb tense (ex. develops vs. developed)?
  • Is my text the same size (your sub-heads can be the same size or bigger than your text) throughout?

3. Start each sentence (for your job responsibilities and accomplishments) with a strong action verb. Using action verbs will grab your audience’s attention and keep your resume vibrant. Think: how much better does the word “spearheaded” sound than “managed?”

4. Start your work experience and other areas of your resume with your most recent experience. This way, it’s easy for your recruiter or hiring manager to get an accurate, chronological progression of your experience.

5. Double check your employment dates. If you need to undergo a background check, you want to make sure you have all your ducks in a row – so check your previous W-2s.

6. Spell check/proof read your resume. Seriously, self-explanatory. It’s important to keep in mind that spell check isn’t fool proof. If you feel like your eyes are going to fall out of your head proof reading your resume, send it to a friend or look at it with fresh eyes the next day

7. Update your resume after something substantial happens. My boyfriend always makes fun of me for being so quick to update my resume, but it’s so I don’t forget things when they happen. I can barely remember what I ate for breakfast, so updating my resume almost immediately after I accomplish something or take on a new responsibility makes my life easier in the long-run. When I am ready to apply to for a new job, I don’t need to sit down and think hard about all the great things I’ve done in my current role. Plus, I’m always on my computer, and it normally takes about five seconds to add or update a line or two on my resume.

8. Update your objective statement to fit the job you’re applying for or create an overall “profile” statement. I personally don’t believe in objective statements. Clearly, the recruiters at the company you’re applying for know why you’re applying – it’s because you think you’re qualified for the job and want to work for their company. Although I don’t believe in objective statements, if you do have one on your resume, make sure it accurately reflects the job description you are applying for. I, on the other hand, have a “profile” statement on my resume, which describes a little bit about who I am as a professional.

Here’s mine, for example:  

Driven communications professional with a passion for creating rich and engaging content, which motivates employees and drives client action. Experience in crafting internal and external communications for senior leaders, technical, marketing, and sales teams in written, audio, and video communication channels.

Fun fact: your profile statement can be the same as your “summary” section on LinkedIn.

9. Upload your file as a PDF when applying for a job. This shows your resume is in true, final form (ready to be read!).

10. Don’t lie. While it might be tempting to “bend the truth” by stating you have a skill you don’t, or that you worked at a place longer than you did, don’t. Be up front and honest. Your prospective employer is going to run a background check on you, and they might find out you’re lying. Is it really worth being branded a liar and risking any chance you may have at a company you want to work for? The answer is no. Although you might not be qualified or chosen for the job you want, your prospective employer might keep you in mind for other positions in the future, or give you a chance to build your work experience.

Have any more tips for writing your resume that I didn’t mention? Share in the comments below!

Need advice on your resume? Feel free to “Talk to Tosti” and drop me a message!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.